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Articles whose contents have formative character.

Monday, 24 February 2014 16:56

Aileron Rolls and Their Importance Featured

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Tonel por tiemposThe definition of a roll has changed a lot since José Luis Aresti defined the slow roll as the 360º rotation of a plane along its longitudinal axis for a duration of less than 15 seconds.  He called the roll that lasts more than 15 seconds the “Super Slow Roll”. In reality, the term "slow" had nothing to do with the rolling rate that the maneuver produces, rather it was used to differentiate it from the super slow roll. 

Wednesday, 05 February 2014 16:17

Humpty Bump Part I

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The Humpty Bump is one of the most basic and versatile maneuvers in aerobatics. It consists of a combination of ascending and descending lines with half-arc or "loop" between both lines. In its simplest form, it is considered one of the basic aerobatic figures in which, for the first time, new pilots are forced to work with the aircraft at low speeds, with large gyroscopic forces produced by the propeller.

Tuesday, 12 November 2013 10:56

Manage Your Energy! Featured

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"The way you manage the available energy is an  

important key in aerobatics"

When a plane is parked on the ground, it doesn't have any energy - or at least any that can be used.

A plane in movement has energy that can be utilized not only for flying and maintaining a certain altitude, but also for maneuvering.

For the purpose of understanding aerobatic flight, we say that an aircraft in flight basically has two types of energy. Added together, this is considered all the energy the aircraft has in any given moment.

Wednesday, 17 July 2013 09:20

The Loop

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The loop is a vertical maneuver, which consists of making a vertical circle from straight and level flight.

 

Sunday, 26 May 2013 00:00

Prevention of the G-LOC Part 2/2 Featured

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Maniobra Anti-G M-1

How To Prevent G-LOC

A proven way to prevent G-LOC is undoubtedly "not pulling G's," however if you are reading this, it is likely because you've already gone beyond straight and level flight.

Simply by reading this article, you've already taken a step in preventing G-LOC, since you are increasing your understanding of the problem. If you are conscious of the possibility of G-LOC in flight, you will be capable of preventing its consequences. 

Tuesday, 07 May 2013 00:00

Dehydration and G-Tolerance

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Regulacion por conduccion

An aerobatic pilot having excellent physical and psychic preparation can make a huge difference among athletes that compete at the highest level. The athlete's physical and mental state before starting any competition should be at optimal level; however the environmental conditions to which the pilot is subjected, for example the heat and humidity, can be a key factor in his performance, and as a result, in the quality of his flight.

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A thorough review of why a “system” is necessary in aerobatic competition judging, and what FPS does for us. 

Sports Results and Judging Systems

In most competitive sports selecting the winner is easy ... it will be the first race-car past the finishing post, or the football team that scores the most goals, and so on. However some sports require experienced judges to rank the artistic and technical skills on display, and competition aerobatics is one of many activities where it takes a trained expert to tell how well each performance has met the standard required. Where such complicated judgements are required it is normal to assume that the performance can theoretically be perfect, so we simply need to count the “errors” that are seen and calculate the mark for each item by subtracting the total of errors seen from a fixed number - the winner of course is the one with the highest remaining score after adjusting for complexity and other factors.

Friday, 26 October 2012 14:45

Zero error margin

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When you ask a stunt pilot in an airshow how the risk can be controlled, the maxim usually used is “make what is easy look difficult, and what is difficult…don’t do it.” However, the reality of airshows reveals to us that if in aviation there is no such thing as zero risk, this is even truer in the world of aerobatic exhibitions.

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Competitions begin soon, and a good flight training that is technical (sequences, maneuvers, etc.) as well as physical is crucial to establish a good season and meet the objectives we have proposed, regardless of the type, during the planned aerobatic competitions for this year.

Friday, 02 December 2011 14:58

G-LOC Part 1

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Ejemplo de un piloto en G-LOC a solo 5,5 Gs

G-LOC is known as G-force Loss Of Consciousness caused by spending a period of time in acceleration or G's.

Our brain is the most important organ of our body, and besides also being that which pays the gas bills to fly, it is the most essential component within the aerobatic plane. One might expect that it works when everything else has failed, but for that to be true, it would have to have an STBY energy storage system and completely be independent of other organs and tissues.

"Aerobatics is the hidden rythm of our soul..."

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